Easy Spring Photography Tips

Spring is one of my favorite seasons to be a photographer. Whether you’re a landscape photographer, a wedding photographer, or are in the events space, exciting things are happening in March, April and May.

But, as is always the case, I’m trying to push myself during this season to grow in my photographic skills and pursue some projects I haven’t before.

If you’d like to join me on this journey, here are some easy spring photography tips for you.

Focus on the Details

Bokeh, lighting, patterns and backgrounds are all details you can focus on in your spring photography.

Since spring photography is all about reinvigorating the senses, you’ll want to focus on finding as much light, new growth and texture as possible.

For instance, if your spring photography looks more like flower photography then you can use bokeh to capture a single flower amidst a buttery background of other flowers. Just make sure to use a wide aperture.

This technique isn’t limited to just flowers, either.

Using a shallow depth of field allows you to zero in on any subject and render the background beautifully blurred.

Find ladybugs or other insects, take a pet portrait, or make a single leaf on a branch your subject. Whatever the case, focusing on the details will help you practice your creative and technical skills.

Spring is Perfect for Portraits

I try to take all of my personal portraits during spring, and I tell other people to do the same as part of my spring photography tips and tricks list.

Portraits taken during spring have the added advantage of using gorgeous blooming backgrounds, and clients are more than willing to travel to find them.

So not only are you practicing your portrait photography, but you’re getting out and traveling, which is a great time to do some location scouting.

I try to take all of my personal portraits during spring, and I tell other people to do the same as part of my spring photography tips and tricks list.

Portraits taken during spring have the added advantage of using gorgeous blooming backgrounds, and clients are more than willing to travel to find them.

So not only are you practicing your portrait photography, but you’re getting out and traveling, which is a great time to do some location scouting.

There’s also no time like springtime for street photography. Head to your nearest park and begin photographing people enjoying the warmth for the first time in months.

Again, widen that aperture, minimize the depth of field, and see how beautiful a tack-sharp portrait subject can be against a bokeh-filled background!

Shoot at Dawn

Of all my spring photography tips, this one can really be applied to any season. However, shooting at dawn during the spring helps you to capture the natural beauty of your locations because you can catch the dew and mist of this fun season.

Shooting dew on flowers adds another layer of texture to your photos that you barely have to work for and a field full of dewy flowers is incredibly ambient.

A Circular Polarizer

Last but not least, you’ll want to add a circular polarizer to your kit.

Springtime is all about blue skies and storms rolling in, and with a circular polarizer, you can enhance the look of the sky.

A polarizer boosts contrast in the sky, making the blue of the atmosphere deeper and the white color of the clouds brighter.

Polarizers also minimize glare off of non-metallic surfaces, like water. This comes in handy when you come across a pond, lake or other body of water and want to be able to see down into the water, rather than be blinded by the sun’s reflection.

With a polarizer, rain protection for your camera, and an all-weather camera strap, you’ll be ready to rock this spring!

Previous Article Next Article